2014 Convention Update: Jumps Symposiums

2014 Convention Update: Jumps Symposiums

NEW ORLEANS – The 2014 USTFCCCA Convention from December 15-18 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix, Arizona, will serve as an opportunity for jumps coaches to attend Symposium presentations from some of the nation’s premier coaches.

As with the other Symposium disciplines—endurance, sprints/hurdles/relays, and throws—eight prominent jumps coaches will give hour-long presentations on specific aspects of their areas of expertise, available to all attendees registered for the convention.

Leading these technical sessions at the convention will be:

  • Now the jumps/multis coach at UConn, Moose Akanno mentored Dartmouth women to school records in the high, long, and triple jumps plus the pentathlon and both short hurdles races.  Akanno and his athletes did that in just four years—in each of those seasons, the Green also had Janae Dunchack win the indoor pentathlon at the Heps (Ivy League) championship.
  • Chris Beene is the leader of one of the most dominant college programs in the United States.  Beene’s South Plains College men’s squads have won the last eight NJCAA outdoor titles, while his women have won five of the last six. After twelve seasons at South Plains, nine NJCAA meet or national records belong to Beene-coached athletes.  All told, Texan individuals and relays have won over 100 national titles in his tenure.
  • In a decorated coaching career at Kansas and Arizona, Tom Hays has mentored three different athletes to Division I national titles in the pole vault.  He’s entering his tenth season at Kansas, where Natalya Bartnovskaya (2013 indoor), Jordan Scott (2010 indoor/outdoor), and Amy Linnen (2005 outdoor) won NCAAs under his program. At Arizona, Hays coached vaulters to two national titles and two collegiate records.
  • Dave Kerin is USATF’s men’s development chair and the event chair for both sexes in the high jump.  He’s one of the leading researchers in the field of jumps biomechanics, specializing in the value of eccentric-specific training over more traditional methods.   In  his 14 years as a Middlebury assistant, Kerin coached Kristy Laramee to national titles in 1999, 2000, and 2001. Laramee still holds the Division III indoor and outdoor championship meet records—1.81m outdoors and 1.80m indoors.
  • The chair of the USTFCCCA Track & Field Academy Advisory Board and a key figure in the growth of the academy, Boo Schexnayder is one of the most skilled and experienced teachers of jumps coaches in the world.   Boo spent 12 years on the LSU staff, producing 19 NCAA champions.  Professionally, he’s coached ten Olympians and served as the head jumps coach for the 2008 American Olympic team.  Under Schexnayder’s guidance, Walter Davis won four world championship medals in the triple jump—highlighted by outdoors gold in 2005—and  John Moffit won silver at the 2004 Olympics.
  • Now the jumps/multis coach at Tennessee, Berry Shumpert has been wildly successful at each of his stops.  From 2001-2004 as a UT volunteer, Shumpert assisted with a national champion and thirteen All-Americans; in ’05 and ’06 at Miami, he was named the National Assistant Coach of the Year; from 2006-12 as the Coastal Carolina associate head, he led squads to eight Big South titles; in 2013 he coached Purdue’s Geoff Davis to two top-five NCAA high jump finishes; and most recently, at Southern Cal, he helped Viktor Fajoyomi to a seventh-place finish at nationals in the decathlon. 
  • Terry VanLaningham has never gone a season in his ten at Sacramento State without having a jumps athlete win at least one Big Sky conference title.  As director of track & field and cross country there, VanLaningham has coached three NCAA All-Americans, two USATF Junior All-Americans, and 44 NCAA national meet qualifiers.  In his decade running the program, 32 school records have gone down.  Before going to Sac State, he was the jumps/multis coach at Wichita State, where he led athletes to seven All-American honors and two national runner-up finishes.
  • In his seventh year as the multi/vault/sprints/hurdles coach at Duke, Shawn Wilbourn’s athletes have broken 21 school records there.  His best known athlete is Curtis Beach, who won the indoor NCAA heptathlon in 2014 and 2012. Before Duke, Wilbourn held a similar position at Georgia; before that, he was the director of track & field and cross country at Cortland State.  In addition to his two NCAA champions and nine All-Americans at Duke, he produced two national titlists and eighteen All-Americans at Cortland.  As an athlete, he competed at worlds in the decathlon in 1997.